LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for AMIA-L Archives


AMIA-L Archives

AMIA-L Archives


AMIA-L@LSV.UKY.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

AMIA-L Home

AMIA-L Home

AMIA-L  August 2003

AMIA-L August 2003

Subject:

Re: The end of motion picture film manufacture???

From:

John P Pytlak <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association of Moving Image Archivists <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 27 Aug 2003 11:21:29 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (183 lines)

Edward Summer wrote:

> Poor John Pytlak and Kodak must feel terribly under the gun as the
result
of recent discussions about the discontinuation and marginalization of
film
stock.

JP: MOTION-PICTURE FILM PRODUCTION BY KODAK IS VERY MUCH ALIVE AND WELL.
ONLY YOU TALK ABOUT "MARGINALIZATION".

> Lest my questions erroneously appear to be directed at John or Kodak,
I'd
like to address them a little differently.

> I've been thinking about all this for days now, and I'm finally going to
take a stab at it.

JP: YOUR QUESTIONS ARE BASED ON ERRONEOUS ASSUMPTIONS AND MISINFORMATION.

> It's "common knowledge" in the archive community, the film distribution
community, and the film exhibition community that "Kodak intends
imminently
to permanently stop the manufacture of motion picture film."   Whether
this
is true or not, is what this e-mail is attempting to bring to the fore.

JP: YOU ARE WRONG, AND YOUR SOURCES ARE WRONG.

> Kodak "denies" this, and yet the manufacture of double perf 16mm film is
about to stop.  Permanently. Forever.

JP: AS I WROTE BEFORE, KODAK IS CONTINUING MANUFACTURE OF DOUBLE PERF 16MM
FOR MANY FILMS, ESPECIALLY THOSE REQUIRED FOR SPECIAL NEEDS LIKE HIGH
SPEED CAMERAS:

JP Link:
http://www.kodak.com/US/plugins/acrobat/en/motion/products/change/kn2july2003.pdf

> So the first question is:
To what extent is the above statement actually true?

JP: IT IS NOT TRUE.  KODAK'S MOTION PICTURE BUSINESS IS GROWING.

> Can anyone answer definitively ???

JP: I JUST DID!

> The second issue is the PERCEIVED truth of this statement.

> If it is NOT TRUE, why then there is nothing to worry about or even
discuss: archives will be able to go on preserving and circulating
spectacular prints (of the quality of Triage's amazing Arzner prints or --
dare I say -- even better) at a reasonable cost , ad infinitum, now and
forever, world without end.

JP: NOTHING LASTS FOREVER, BUT THE MOTION PICTURE FILM BUSINESS CONTINUES
TO GROW.

> If it IS TRUE, how will the public and scholars get to see the last
surviving motion picture prints of films both rare and common?
It follows that those single prints will be SO PRECIOUS that the (forgive
the term) "anal retentive" policies of archives will actually be justified
by something real and not imagined.

> So, assuming for the moment that it's NOT TRUE, that film will be
available
forever, and that the price of film will remain reasonable, how can
archives justify:

> 1) the prohibitively restrictive policies on print circulation ?
> 2) the exorbitant prices for making prints from existing preservation
elements (real example: one archive charges US$50,000.00 to make a print
from a 3,000 foot, pre-existing preservation element and only on the
condition that they will not guarantee when or if they will ever deliver
this print!) ?
> 3) the "oath of silence" about the issues involved ?

JP: THESE ARE ISSUES BETWEEN YOU AND THE ARCHIVE.  THEY ARE NOT DUE TO
UNAVAILABILITY OF FILM STOCK FROM KODAK.

> I'm at a bit of a loss to quote my sources for this information because
of
the climate of fear in the archival community. I've just perused an
extraordinary interview in "The Moving Image" with Iris Barry in which she
lucidly explains the history of  this paranoia amongst archivists
(government intervention, loss of unique material, and so on), so I'm
coming to understand the traditional behavior of what one might call
"old-guard" archivists (no value judgment intended, just historical
perspective). Nonetheless, I must respect the wishes of certain folks to
remain anonymous.

JP: FILM STOCK IS AVAILABLE.  ANONYMOUS SOURCES TEND TO BE UNRELIABLE.

> So there are the questions, including, now, the question of why
archivists
and distributors and exhibitors are terrified to speak out against this
"reign of terror."

JP: I DON'T UNDERSTAND YOUR CHOICE OF WORDS.  WHO IS CREATING A "REIGN OF
TERROR"?

> The only thing at stake here is the entire future of  filmed motion
picture
entertainment, preservation, distribution and scholarship. Not much
really.

> What do y'all think about this?

JP: I THINK THE FUTURE REMAINS BRIGHT.

> Edward Summer

JP: TO BE COMPLETE, I AM ATTACHING MY REPLY TO YOUR NOTE OF LAST WEEK,
WHERE I ALREADY RESPONDED TO YOUR CONCERNS:

___________________________________________________________________________________

On August 21, John Pytlak wrote:

There are over 100,000 35mm theatres worldwide, and still a few hundred
capable of 70mm 5-perf.  Despite the "digital revolution", modern,
well-equipped, new 35mm film theatres and 70mm IMAX theatres are still
being built throughout Asia:

http://wwwcn.kodak.com/CN/en/corp/pressCenter/pr20001114.shtml

http://www.boxoff.com/dec98asia4.html

http://imaxcorporation.visualnet.com/visualweb/notepress_detail.html?nPressId=3401&NOHEADER=yes

http://imaxcorporation.visualnet.com/visualweb/notepress_detail.html?nPressId=3203&NOHEADER=yes

So even if the university can't provide a good film theatre, there are
likely some in the city who would welcome your students.

> Eastman Kodak at a corporate level has given the impression that they
are
going to STOP MANUFACTURING 35mm film stock.

Just where did you get that wrong impression?  Realigning manufacturing
facilities, tuning product portfolios,  and optimizing worldwide plant
loading to make the best possible film at the lowest possible cost are
worthy goals.  More 35mm motion-picture film is being used than any time
in history.  Kodak just introduced the revolutionary new VISION2 Color
Negative Films, with more to come. Kodak is a leader in BOTH film and
digital imaging:

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/pressReleases/pr20030723-01.shtml

Kodak financial results:  "...Highlights for the quarter (2Q-2003) include
a 65% increase in consumer digital camera sales, and an 18% increase in
sales of motion-picture origination and print film."

Even notable "digital revolution" companies are having tough times:

http://www.sony.net/SonyInfo/IR/financial/fr/2003-7-24/pdf/sony20030724.pdf

Kodak's R&D shows a clear mix of both film and digital innovations:

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/researchDevelopment/techProdHighlights.shtml

> Is this a PR problem on Kodak's part? Where is the truth here?
Youth (well, maybe not youth...) wants to know.

Now you know. :-) Kodak has been a leader in motion-pictures for over a
century, and intends to remain a leader.

John

(signed by:)
John P. Pytlak
Senior Technical Specialist
Customer Technical Services
Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Eastman Kodak Company
Rochester, New York 14650-1922  USA
Telephone: +1 585 477 5325
Cell: +1 585 781 4036
Fax: +1 585 722 7243
e-mail: [log in to unmask]
website: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LSV.UKY.EDU

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager