LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for AMIA-L Archives


AMIA-L Archives

AMIA-L Archives


AMIA-L@LSV.UKY.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

AMIA-L Home

AMIA-L Home

AMIA-L  January 2006

AMIA-L January 2006

Subject:

Re: Long-term storage - was Forbes' number one

From:

Jeff Kreines <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association of Moving Image Archivists <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 15 Jan 2006 15:15:41 -0600

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (56 lines)

On Jan 15, 2006, at 9:50 AM, Jim Wheeler wrote:

> The January 9 issue of Forbes Magazine has Seagate on the cover and  
> Forbes has named Seagate "The company of the Year for 2006

I like Seagate hard drives -- though I have a couple sitting waiting  
to be replaced under warranty -- but even if a company is "the  
biggest and most efficient" that doesn't mean that, for long-term  
archiving, hard drives are the way to go.

I worry about long-term storage of "shelved" hard drives -- not  
powered up for a long time, sitting on a shelf, and capable of being  
dropped, bumped, knocked about.

Yes, one could make a set of Sorbothane corners for the drives, and  
store them in "cans" like film.  (We designed such a mount for 12  
1.8" hard drives for our digital cinema camera, and, indeed, the  
drives were well isolated from shock.)

But, until cheap, reliable holographic or other storage comes about,  
I think data tape formats like LTO-3 (and the upcoming LTO-4) offer  
many advantages for archiving -- including low cost (under $0.25  
gigabyte), multiple suppliers, and easy robotic libraries that can  
handle cloning tapes and migrating them to future media.

Face it -- the future is going to be filled with painful continuous  
data migration every few years, which will remain a big expense for  
any archive.

With this in mind, a few years ago we designed a machine to record  
data to 35mm unperforated B&W microfilm stock, as bits -- it would be  
possible to achieve a pretty decent data packing rate (higher if the  
film didn't ever need to be printed for duplication).  This would  
have the advantages of B&W film for long-term shelf storage.  The  
machine was designed to verify data, too.  But I don't think too many  
archives would want to invest in such a device, because who knows  
what the future holds (and how long microfilm will be available!).

Of course, the same idea could be modified, and one could store laser- 
etched bits on a clear polyester support.  Kodak and Philips worked  
on this idea a few years ago, but abandoned it. (One could apply  
holographic storage principles to this, and record many layers deep  
on the strand of material, though this makes it more difficult to  
build low-cost simple devices to recapture the data.)  Theoretically,  
this could be quite cheap in terms of storage media, and, being  
burned into the surface, should survive quite nicely.

However, InPhase and Hitachi claim to be delivering a first- 
generation holographic archival disc in 2006 -- 300 gb on a 130mm  
disk (like a CD) with a data rate of 20 MB/second.  Not bad, if the  
media costs are reasonable.  Who knows about long-term storage, of  
course -- but the claim is that it's designed for archiving.

So use LTO-3 now, in in 5 years clone the tapes to holographic media.

Jeff "Forbes is a business magazine, not a technology magazine" Kreines

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LSV.UKY.EDU

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager